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Electronic kiosks

Electronic kiosks

Edited by Dónal Rice, Senior Design Advisor, ICT, Centre for Excellence in Universal Design, NDA

Section Summary
Electronic Kiosks include within their ambit things like ATMs, information kiosks, and electronic vending machines. There are several aspects to their accessibility: the primary is physical accessibility, where barriers or obstacles to the operable path will mean users are unable to access it. The other aspect is user interface accessibility, where the various physical actions associated with the kiosk: for example, pressing buttons, or using keypads, each of which needs to be addressed from the accessibility viewpoint. The section contains links to advice and guidelines on these components. 

Overview of accessibility issues for electronic kiosks
Electronic kiosks include (but are not limited to):
•    ATMs (Automated Teller Machines)

•    Information kiosks

•    Ticket vending machines

•    Electronic voting machines

•    Information displays (e.g. flight information)

•    Point of sale customer card payment systems

•    Card door entry systems

Physical access
Persons with a disability who have a permanent or temporary condition which restricts their mobility may need to use a wheelchair or a motorised buggy or crutches to move around. If there are barriers in the way to the kiosk, such as steps, posts or signage, it may be difficult or even impossible for them to get to it. These hindrances may also cause problems for people with restricted vision, particularly those who are totally blind.

The path to the kiosk must be free from obstacles such as steps, bins or signage that would obstruct the progress of users who are either walking or using a mobility aid such as a wheelchair or a motorised buggy. This includes the path into any room or area containing the kiosk. The user should be able to operate the kiosk from a clear, flat area large enough to manoeuvre mobility aids such as a wheelchair or buggy. There should be provision for adequate lighting.

The operable parts of an electronic kiosk include such things as buttons and keypads, input slots for cards or money and dispensers for tickets, receipts or returned money. Users should be able to access all of these from whatever position and orientation they find themselves in naturally when using the terminal. Preferably, this should be a single position which does not require the person to reorientate themselves during the operation.

User interface accessibility
Using the terminal may require a number of physical operations: pressing buttons or keys, turning knobs or other moving parts, inputting cards or other items and retrieving cards, tickets or other outputs. All these operations should be possible with minimal grip, pushing and pulling strength or twisting of the wrist.

The user interface may consist of a number of discrete components, each with their own accessibility issues such as:
• Labels and instructions
• Smart Cards
• Displays
• Keypads
• Touchscreens

The following resources provide accessibility advice and guidelines that cover all of these different components.

Public Access Terminal Guidelines. Complied by the Centre for Excellence in Universal Design at the National Disability Authority, Ireland.
Summary:
These guidelines cover all information and services delivered by means of electronic kiosks (or Public Access Terminals) such as ATMs (Automated Teller Machines), Information kiosks, Ticket vending machines and e-voting machines.
Reference: http://www.universaldesign.ie/it-accessibility-guidelines/public-access-terminals
Keywords:
Electronic Kiosks; Guidelines.checklists
Target audiences: Policy makers; IT managers; System developers


Smart Card Accessibility Guidelines by the Centre for Excellence in Universal Design at the National Disability Authority, Ireland
Summary:
A smart card is a personal device that provides an intelligent link between the user and the system being used. It can help to make a system usable by the widest possible community of users by allowing the system to provide users with the best interface for their needs. These guidelines cover all information and services delivered by means of a Smart Card and include guidelines on physical access and user interface issues.
Reference:
http://www.universaldesign.ie/useandapply/ict/itaccessibilityguidelines/smartcards/guidelinesforsmartcardaccessibility/smartcardguidelines
Keywords:
Smart cards; Electronic Kiosks; Guidelines
Target audiences:
System developers; IT managers; Policy makers


Accessibility for the Disabled: A Design Manual for a Barrier Free Environment
Summary:
This manual provides a set of design considerations which contain useful anthropometrical data covering required path dimensions for wheelchairs.
Reference:
http://www.un.org/esa/socdev/enable/designm/index.html
Prepared by the Urban Management Department of the Lebanese Company for the Development and Reconstruction of Beirut Central District (SOLIDERE) in collaboration with the United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Western Asia (ESCWA) and with the approval of the Ministry of Social Affairs and the National Committee for the Disabled.
Keywords:
Electronic Kiosks; Physical access; Wheelchair access
Target audiences:
System developers; IT managers; Policy makers


International standards on the procedures that should be followed when making Smartcard services accessible. Complied by the Centre for Excellence in Universal Design at the National Disability Authority, Ireland.
Summary:
International standards on the procedures that should be followed when making Smartcard services accessible. From Austrailia, America, Britain, Canada, Norway, Japan and the European Union.
Reference:
http://www.universaldesign.ie/useandapply/ict/itaccessibilityguidelines/smartcards/guidelines/smartcardguidelines/standards
Keywords:
Electronic Kiosks; Smart cards; Standards
Target audiences:
System developers; IT managers; Policy makers


Accessibility to ICT Products and services by Disabled and Elderly People Towards a framework for further development of EU legislation or other co-ordination measures on eAccessibility
Summary:
This report examines what legislative or other options could be considered at EU-level in order to better support the achievement of a more effective, coordinated and complete approach to e-accessibility across the Member States.  It includes examples of legislative approaches to improving accessibility of “self-service terminals”. Examples for Portugal, United sates of America, Australia and Canada.
Reference: http://ec.europa.eu/information_society/activities/einclusion/docs/access/comm_2008/framework.doc
A study commissioned by the ICT for Inclusion Unit of the European Commission DG Information Society and Media. Study jointly coordinated by:
- empirica Gesellschaft für Kommunikations- und Technologieforschung mbH, Bonn
- Work Research Centre Ltd, Dublin
Other organisations comprising the core study team include:
- The Blanck Group LLC, Syracuse, New York
- Centre for Disability Law & Policy, National University of Ireland, Galway
- The Personal Social Services Research Unit at the London School of Economics and Political Science, London
- Norwegian Social Research, Oslo
Keywords: Electronic Kiosks; Legislative approaches; Examples of legislation
Target audiences: Policy makers; Advocacy organisations


EZ Access interface enhancements
Summary:
EZ Access® is a simple set of interface enhancements which can be applied to electronic products and devices so that they can be used by more people including those with disabilities.
Reference:
http://trace.wisc.edu/projects/ez/
Keywords:
Electronic Kiosks; User interface; Usability
Target audiences:
Developers; IT managers; Policy makers


Smart Card Application Case Studies. Complied by the Centre for Excellence in Universal Design at the National Disability Authority, Ireland
Summary:
Two case studies looking at the French health card, the SESAM-Vitale system is one of the most highly regarded smart card based systems in the European healthcare sector and the Tampere (Finland) City Card which is a citizen card that allows access to local services.
Reference
: http://www.universaldesign.ie/useandapply/ict/itaccessibilityguidelines/smartcards/about/makingsmartcardservicesaccessible

Keywords: Electronic Kiosks; Smart cards; Case studies

Target audiences: Policy makers; IT managers; System developers


Existing solutions and good practices adopted around the world

Public phones

Example to follow


Transportation check-in counters

Talking way finding kiosk: a press release from the Department of Transport in New York City
Summary: Example of a kiosk that uses sounds, video and spoken and tactile instructions to help direct blind and low-vision passengers at the Whitehall Ferry Terminal in Lower Manhattan.
Reference: http://www.nyc.gov/html/dot/html/pr2008/pr08_042.shtml
Keywords: Electronic Kiosks; Transport; Way finding
Target audiences: Policy makers; Transport operators; Developers


ATMs

Accessible ATM: an article by Access Israel on Bank Leumi’s launch of an accessible ATM in Tel Aviv, 2006
Summary: Example of an ATM adapted for use by visually impaired and blind persons, people using one hand, people with postural problems, elderly people, people using wheelchairs and people with short stature. Blind people can use the ATM with a pair of earphones that can be borrowed at the bank branch along with a training kit on CD.
Keywords: Electronic Kiosks; Transport; Way finding
Target audiences: Policy makers; Transport operators; Developers


Voting machines

Examples to follow


Point of Sales Self-Service Terminals (Rite Aid settlement)

Rite Aid Tactile Point of Sale (POS) Agreement
Summary: The Rite Aid Point of Sale (POS) Agreement was a Structured Negotiation Agreement by which Rite Aid agreed to ensure that all of its 5000 stores will have accessible and confidential POS devices.
Reference: http://lflegal.com/2008/04/rite-aid-pos-agreement/
Keywords: Point of Sale devices; PIN; Privacy
Target audiences: Policy makers; Commercial bodies; Developers


Accessibility features most desired by persons with disabilities
Covered in Overview - Physical Access & User interface accessibility


Industry perspectives on likely technology evolution
“Accessible voting” by the Trace Research & Development Center, College of Engineering, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Summary: Information on Trace’s publications and approach to making evoting machines accessible and usable for all Reference: http://trace.wisc.edu/voting/
Keywords:
Electronic Kiosks, e-voting, voting standards
Target audiences:
Policy makers; Electoral officials; Developers